Introduction to Philosophy
50:730:111:90
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Professor Young
An exploration of central philosophical problems, such as truth, justice, mind, and person, with a view to surveying the field and locating particular philosophical specialties within it such as logic, ethics, and metaphysics. Fulfills new general education requirement in Ethics and Values (EAV).

Symbolic Logic
50:730:201:01
M/W 9:35 am – 10:55 am
Professor Agule
An introduction to modern symbolic logic, with an emphasis on methods for the evaluation and construction of deductive arguments, and on the concepts of validity, consistency, and implication. Additional topics may be selected from among the following: informal fallacies, logic and ordinary language, induction, the scientific method, syllogistic logic, and the relation between logic and other areas in philosophy. Satisfies requirement for Philosophy Major. Fulfills new general education requirement in Logical and Quantitative Reasoning (LQR).

History of Philosophy
50:730:212:01
M/W 12:30 pm – 1:50 pm
Professor Betz
The development of philosophy from its modern beginnings in Descartes. Readings selected from the classical modern period, from Descartes through Kant. Topics include the relationship between mind and body, the origins and extent of human knowledge, skepticism and belief, and the nature of personal identity. Satisfies requirement for the Philosophy Major and Minor. Fulfills new general education requirement in Heritages and Civilizations (HAC).

Mind Knowledge and Reality
50:730:220:01
M/W 6:00 pm – 7:20 pm
Professor Denehy
An investigation of fundamental problems in metaphysics, epistemology, and the philosophy of mind. Topics addressed include the nature of the mind, its relation to the world, and the possibilities for knowledge. Satisfies requirement in metaphysics/epistemology for Philosophy Major and Minor.

Debate Ethical Issues Across Disciplines
50:730:240:01
T/TH 11:10 am – 12:30 pm
Professor Wall, Professor Moran
This course trains students in ethical reasoning and argumentation through both the study of ethics as a discipline and the practice of ethical debate in an ethics bowl competition. Students gain not only an understanding of ethical ideas and argumentation, but also skills in constructing arguments, oral communication, close reading, community outreach, and event organization.

Biomedical Ethics
50:730:249:90
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Professor Yates
Exploration of moral issues in medicine and medical research. Course will typically focus on issues raised by the creation and termination of life and include topics such as abortion, stem cell research, cloning, prenatal screening for disability, right to medical care, human experimentation, genetic enhancement and eugenics, animal experimentation, the diagnosis of death, and euthanasia. Formerly 50:730:349. Fulfills new general education requirement in Ethics and Values (EAV).

Biomedical Ethics
50:730:249:91, 92, 93
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Professor Gentzel
Exploration of moral issues in medicine and medical research. Course will typically focus on issues raised by the creation and termination of life and include topics such as abortion, stem cell research, cloning, prenatal screening for disability, right to medical care, human experimentation, genetic enhancement and eugenics, animal experimentation, the diagnosis of death, and euthanasia. Formerly 50:730:349. Fulfills new general education requirement in Ethics and Values (EAV).

Biomedical Ethics
50:730:249:94,95
$100 Online Course Support Fee
Professor Young
Exploration of moral issues in medicine and medical research. Course will typically focus on issues raised by the creation and termination of life and include topics such as abortion, stem cell research, cloning, prenatal screening for disability, right to medical care, human experimentation, genetic enhancement and eugenics, animal experimentation, the diagnosis of death, and euthanasia. Formerly 50:730:349. Fulfills new general education requirement in Ethics and Values (EAV).

Philosophy of Law
50:730:258:01
M/W 2:05 pm – 3:25 pm
Professor Agule
Introduction to philosophical issues concerning the nature of law and its relation to morality and to power. Focuses on the concept of justice and punishment, the function of law, and types of legal argument. Legal materials include cases drawn from constitutional law, contracts, torts, and criminal law. Formerly 50:730:320. Fulfills new general education requirement in Ethics and Values (EAV).

Topics in Ancient Philosophy
50:730:305:01
M/W 9:35 am – 10:55 am
Professor Rooney
Critical examination of major issues in ancient philosophy as discussed in the works selected from, for example, pre-Socratic philosophers, Plato, Aristotle, Stoics, Skeptics, Epicureans, Plotinus, and the neo-Platonic tradition. Course content varies from year to year, either by dealing primarily with particular issues (metaphysics, epistemology, ethics, social and political philosophy, or aesthetics, for example) or by dealing primarily with the works of a sub-set of philosophers.

Twentieth Century Philosophy
50:730:310:01
F 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm
Professor Sacks
Major movements in 20th-century philosophy, such as American Pragmatism, development of logic, logical positivism, existentialism, phenomenology, structuralism and post-structuralism, and deconstruction. Philosophers such as Peirce, James, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Sartre, Arendt, Heidegger, Husserl, Gadamer, Foucault, and Derrida. Formerly 50:730:308.

Political Philosophy
50:730:342:01
T 2:00 pm – 4:50 pm
Professor Yates
Major movements in 20th-century philosophy, such as American Pragmatism, development of logic, logical positivism, existentialism, phenomenology, structuralism and post-structuralism, and deconstruction. Philosophers such as Peirce, James, Frege, Russell, Wittgenstein, Sartre, Arendt, Heidegger, Husserl, Gadamer, Foucault, and Derrida. Formerly 50:730:308.

Social Philosophy
50:730:343:01
M/W 2:05 pm – 3:25 pm
Professor Betz
Critical examination of the philosophical problems involved in theories of the society and relationships between individuals. Topics include ways gender and/or racial consideration enter into the social standing of the individual, political and economic consequences of one’s social class, and the use of liberalism, critical social theory, and post-modernism to challenge existing social institutions. Satisfies requirement in ethical/political/social theory for Philosophy Major and Minor. Fulfills new general education requirement in Ethics and Values (EAV) and Diversity (DIV).

5
0:730:389, 390, Independent Study in Philosophy
An individual reading and research project under the guidance of a member of the philosophy department in an area of interest to the department. Prerequisite: Permission of department.