INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGION
Course#  50:840:103:01
M/W 3:45 pm – 5:05 pm 
Professor Karapanagiotis
GEN ED:  GCM (Global Communities), GS (Global Studies)

This course introduces students to major academic methods for the study of religion and theories about religious belief and practice. It draws on diverse materials from the world’s religions and multiple disciplinary approaches. Topics may include belief systems, morality, sacred literature, myth, ritual, history, gender, ethnicity, and debates about the roles of religion in contemporary life.

INTRODUCTION TO RELIGION & CONTEMPORARY CULTURE
Course#  50:840:108:90
ONLINE 
Professor Wall
GEN ED:  D (Diversity), EAV (Ethics and Values)

A study of the ways that religion may or may not have significance for our world today, examining issues such as the meaning of religious experience, evil and goodness, the purposes of ritual, roles of religion in society and culture, the impact of science and technology on religion, and issues in ethics.

INTRODUCTION TO THE BIBLE
Course#  50:840:110:90
Online
Professor Wall
GEN ED:  C (Civilization & Heritages), G (Global Studies)

Historical and literary exploration of portions of the Tanach (Old Testament) and New Testament that have had the most lasting influence on Western culture. Focus on the meaning of key terms like covenant and evil, biblical authorship, and different ways the text may be interpreted today.

ASIAN RELIGIONS
Course#  50:840:111:01
W 6:00 pm – 8:00 pm 
Professor McCauley – (note email will be updated as it becomes available)

GEN ED:  C (Civilizations & Heritages), GCM (Global Communities)

A historical and comparative study of the religions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto and their expressions in the cultures of India, China, and Japan.

JEWS, CHRISTIANS, AND MUSLIMS
Course#  50:840:112:01
T/TH 8:00 am – 9:20 am 
Professor Banner
GEN ED:  HAC (Heritages and Civilizations)

The historical development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam from the earliest roots in the myths and rituals of the ancient world to their modern forms. The interaction between each tradition and the cultural context in which it emerges and develops. The popular expression of each religion’s beliefs in its holidays, rituals, and legends.

MYTH AND SYMBOL
Course#  50:840:123:90
Online
Professor Salyer
GEN ED:  AAI (Art, Aesthetics, and Theories of Interpretation)

Comparative studies of the creation myths and hero myths of selected Eastern, Middle Eastern, European, Native American, and African cultures. Attention given to the religious worldview, the psychological and social implications, and the symbolic forms of expression of each. Various methodologies for the study of myth investigated.

PAUL AND THE FOUNDING OF CHRISTIANITY
Course#  50:840:210:90
Online
Professor Banner
GEN ED:  HAC (Heritages and Civilizations)

This course will explore the writings of Paul, arguably the most influential author in Christianity, as well as those who reacted to him and even directly opposed him. It will also consider Paul’s relationship to Judaism, the historical Jesus and the early followers of Jesus as well as his contribution to what would eventually become the new religion of Christianity.

ISLAM AND THE MODERN WORLD
Course#  50:840:235:01
W 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm 
Professor Alkiek
GEN ED:  GCM (Global Communities)

An exploration of the diverse manifestations of Islam in the twenty-first century around the globe. Includes study of Islam in relation to such issues as modernity, globalization, women’s rights, fundamentalism, war, and culture.

HAPPINESS
Course#  50:840:276:01
Cross listed with 50:499:456:02

M 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm 
Professor Walker

Happiness is a multidisciplinary exploration of human flourishing. The course draws from the academic study of happiness as explored in the humanities, specifically psychology, philosophy, religious studies, cultural studies, history, and law. The coursesurveys empirical research in the sciences, such as positive psychology, neuroscience, and biology. The content of what will be studied mirrors how it will be taught by drawing upon teaching methods used in resiliency education. Ultimately, the courseis a study of how humans organize themselves, their internal lives, their relationships, and their environments—communally and globally.

ANTI-SEMITISM AND THE HOLOCAUST
Course# 50:840:332:91
Hybrid

M 12:30 pm – 1:50 pm 
Professor Charme
GEN ED:  D (Diversity), EAV (Ethics and Values)

An investigation into the nature and historical development of anti-Semitism in general and Nazism in particular. Examination of specific stages of Nazi genocide as well as implications for modem religion, theories of human nature, and situations we may confront in the future. Integrates material from history, psychology, ethics, theology, and literature in order to evaluate possible responses.

MAGIC AND RITUAL POWER
Course#  50:840:363:01
T/TH 9:35 am – 10:55 am 
Professor Banner
GEN ED:  HAC (Heritages and Civilizations), USW (United States in the World)

An examination of magic throughout history and today in ritual, community, literature, film, television, and personal spirituality. Is magic a form of religion? Are religious rituals forms of magic? How can magic be defined? What is its power? Such questions are asked across diverse practices and beliefs such as in Judaism, Christianity, Wicca, and paganism.

CULTS AND NEW RELIGIOUS MOVEMENTS
Course#  50:840:366:01
M 9:35 am – 10:55 am
Hybrid – some meetings online
Professor Karapanagiotis
GEN ED:  USW (United States in the World)

This course examines religious groups in the United States that have been labeled in the public as “cults.”  We investigate their beliefs and practices, as well as their histories, social dynamics, recruitment strategies, and relationships with the public.  Focus will be on building a scholarly toolkit by which to understand these religious groups in an objective and critical manner.

INDEPENDENT STUDIES

An individual reading and research project under the guidance of a member of the philosophy department in an area of interest to the department. Prerequisite: Permission of department.

Course# 50:840:389:01 
Professor Charme

Course# 50:840:389:02
Professor Karapanagiotis

Course# 50:840:389:03
Professor Wall