INTRODUCTION TO WORLD RELIGIONS
Course#  50:840:103:01
MW 3:45 pm – 5:05 pm 
Professor Gilmore-Clough
GEN ED:  HAC and HAC

A general introduction to the basic religious concerns of humanity, and the ways in which religions have developed in Eastern and Western history, giving intellectual, moral, and institutional expression to the meaning of human existence.

ASIAN RELIGIONS
Course#  50:840:111:01
Th 6:00 pm – 9:00 pm 
Professor McCauley
GEN ED:  GCM

A historical and comparative study of the religions of Hinduism, Buddhism, Taoism, Confucianism, and Shinto and their expressions in the cultures of India, China, and Japan.

JEWS, CHRISTIANS, AND MUSLIMS
Course#  50:840:112:01
T/TH 8:00 pm – 9:20 
Professor Banner
GEN ED:  HAC

The historical development of Judaism, Christianity, and Islam from the earliest roots in the myths and rituals of the ancient world to their modern forms. The interaction between each tradition and the cultural context in which it emerges and develops. The popular expression of each religion’s beliefs in its holidays, rituals, and legends.

MYTH AND SYMBOL
Course#  50:840:123:90
Online
Professor Salyer
GEN ED:  AAI

Comparative studies of the creation myths and hero myths of selected Eastern, Middle Eastern, European, Native American, and African cultures. Attention given to the religious worldview, the psychological and social implications, and the symbolic forms of expression of each. Various methodologies for the study of myth investigated.

RELIGION AND FILM
Course#  50:840:130:90
M/W 12:30 pm – 1:50 pm 
Professor Charme
GEN ED:  AAI

This course examines the use of mythical and religious images and symbols in contemporary films. The cinematic representation of issues of ultimate meaning and ethical values, spiritual quests, hopelessness and despair are analyzed.

GODS, SEX, VIOLENCE IN THE OLD TESTAMENT
Course#  50:840:215:90
Online
Professor Banner
GEN ED:  HAC

This course introduces select books of the Tanakh (Old Testament), as well as the history behind them, in order to examine some of the most unusual, strange and fascinating stories, legends and folktales in the Bible and try to understand them from the point of view of the cultures in which they were written.

AFRICAN AMERICAN RELIGION
Course#  50:840:216:01
M/W 2:05 pm -3:25 pm 
Instructor:  James Johnson
GEN ED:  USW, DIV

The effects of American enslavement on the religious and social institutions of the African people and the development of religious beliefs and institutions within the African-American community. The relationship between black and white religious institutions and the role of religion in the development of black political consciousness.

ISLAM AND THE MODERN WORLD
Course#  50:840:235:01
M/W 3:45 pm 5:05 pm 
Professor Alkiek
GEN ED:  GCM

An exploration of the diverse manifestations of Islam in the twenty-first century around the globe. Includes study of Islam in relation to such issues as modernity, globalization, women’s rights, fundamentalism, war, and culture.

HAPPINESS
Course#  50:840:276:01
M 12:30 pm – 3:20 pm 
Professor Walker
GEN ED:  GCM

Happiness is a multidisciplinary exploration of human flourishing. The course draws from the academic study of happiness as explored in the humanities, specifically psychology, philosophy, religious studies, cultural studies, history, and law. The course surveys empirical research in the sciences, such as positive psychology, neuroscience, and biology. The content of what will be studied mirrors how it will be taught by drawing upon teaching methods used in resiliency education. Ultimately, the course is a study of how humans organize themselves, their internal lives, their relationships, and their environments—communally and globally.

PHILOSOPHY & RELIGIOUS PERSPECTIVES ON CHILDHOOD
Course#  50:840:284:01
Cross listed with 50:730:284:01, 50:163:281:01
M/W 12:30 pm – 1:50 pm 
Professor Wall
GEN ED:  HAC

This course explores the meaning and significance of childhood in society from a variety of philosophical and religious perspectives. The first half of the course critically examines some of the most influential writings on childhood in history from antiquity to modernity. We ask how these classic texts respond to such questions as the nature of childhood, the aims of child rearing, and responsibilities to and of children. The second half investigates some of the central philosophical and religious issues concerning childhood today. It examines such issues as the changing purposes of families, children’s relations to culture, and children’s rights and political participation.

EVIL
50:840:333:90 
CROSS LISTED WITH 50:730:840:333:01
ONLINE
Professor Wall
GEN ED:  EAV

An examination of the phenomenon of evil, particularly moral evil, through close readings of ancient and modern philosophical, religious, political, and literary texts. Questions include whether humanity is vil, how evil could be explained, whether it is compatible with belief in God, and if it sheds useful lighton contemporary issues like terrorism, genocide, racism, and poverty.

RELIGION AND HUMAN RIGHTS
50:840:338:01
M 6:00 pm – 8:50 pm 
Professor Walker
GEN ED:  GCM

The Universal Declaration of Human Rights of 1948 was born in response to the genocide of over six million Jews in Nazi Germany. And yet, its values were conceived hundreds of years prior by religious communities that, in their own geographic and cultural contexts, advocated for protections for human’s inalienable rights. In this Global Communities course, students will use both legal studies and religious studies to examine the origins, developments, effects, and critiques of four legal frameworks: freedom of religion, freedom for religion, freedom fromreligion, and freedom within religion. By studying international case studies, students will cultivate their cross-cultural, inter-religious, and intra-religious understanding about how the rule of law can be used to promote and protect the human right to “freedom of religion or belief” for people of all religions and none. Special attention will be given to the critical examination of the limitations of human-rights frameworks and the limitations of rule-of-law responses to human rights abuses. Why is this such an urgent subject? Over three-quarters of the world’s population lives in countries with high levels of government restrictions on religious people; these restrictions correlate with increased levels of social hostilities and violence. The legal framework of human rights has been a proven, albeit limited, remedy in de-escalating such conflicts, demonstrating that the promotion of peaceful coexistence can be an effective security strategy.

CULTS AND NRM’S
50:840:366:90 
M/W 9:35 am – 10:55 am 
Professor Karapanagiotis
GEN ED:  EAV

This course examines religious groups in the United States that have been labeled in the public as “cults.”  We investigate their beliefs and practices, as well as their histories, social dynamics, recruitment strategies, and relationships with the public.  Focus will be on building a scholarly toolkit by which to understand these religious groups in an objective and critical manner.